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Port Arthur Historic Site

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Natural Wonders

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Amazing Walks

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Unique Wildlife

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Stunning Coastline

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Tasman Peninsula Wildlife

Tasman Peninsula Wildlife

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General info

With a wide range of habitats ranging from coastal dune systems to rainforests, the Tasman Peninsula is a haven for wildlife from the tiniest of Pygmy possums to wombats, wallabies and Tasmanian Devils.

Tasmania is home to two wallaby species including the endemic Tasmanian pademelon found nowhere else on earth. Pademelons and Bennetts wallabies can be encountered day and night whilst exploring the Tasman Peninsula, often with their joeys at heel or hanging from mum’s pouch. Two other species of macropod, the Tasmanian bettong and Long-nosed potoroo can be seen foraging of a night time around many of the holiday accommodations in the area.

Common daytime sightings include Echidnas searching for ants along the roadside and Blue-tongue lizards basking in the sun along walking tracks and on bitumen. A wide variety of bird life includes Tasmanian rosellas, Tasmanian native hens and White-bellied sea eagles which breed on the peninsula.

Common wombats are numerous in the area and although generally nocturnal, can be seen before dusk over the winter months grazing in paddocks and ambling along quiet back roads.

A healthy population of Tasmanian devils reside on the peninsula but despite their fearsome reputation are actually quite shy. As part of the Save the Tasmanian Devil Program, new devils are set to be released in the Tasman area in 2015/16.

Brushtail and ringtail possums are abundant and are frequently seen around campsites and roadsides, often with their joeys clinging to their backs as they forage for food. Spotlighting with a torch at night in eucalypt trees will often reveal possums and if you are lucky, maybe even an owl or tawny frogmouth.

The Tasman Peninsula has an extremely large number of animals that forage nightly including adjacent the roadside and tourist are advised to drive with caution when travelling at night on the peninsula. You will be amazed at the amount and variety of wildlife you will encounter when moving about.